Ziphen Central

Seeking Wisdom and Sublimity

Dinosaurs

Did dinosaurs really exist? How did they become extinct? How long ago did they live? Did people ever see dinosaurs? Were there dinosaurs on Noah’s Ark?

These and many more questions are asked about these gigantic reptiles of the past. It is fascinating to go to museums and see huge dinosaur skeletons and footprints, but unfortunately most of the museums will tell you about how dinosaurs evolved millions of years ago, and of the many theories of how they died out. They’ll also tell you that dinosaurs died out many years before people ever evolved. Read the following questions and find out the true story of dinosaurs. (keep reading)

Posted on 27 June 2008 by Mashkioya
Filed under: science

Glyka and the Magic Lute

A wandering minstrel found one day he could not play his lute.
He strummed and twanged and plucked the strings, but ever were they mute.
A maiden came and asked if he might sing a pretty song.
“Sweet maid,” said he, “I’m sad to say my voice is not too strong.”
“Oh come,” she said, “strike up a tune, for I know that you can.
I saw you singing yesternight in front of every man.”
So he, abashed, took up his lute and then began to sing,
And though his voice was loud and clear, the lute said not a thing.
“O sorry man,” the girl exclaimed, “you must have broke your lute!”
“Oh no,” said he, “that cannot be, its strings are resolute.”
The wondering minstrel tried again, he tried to play a round,
But still the stubborn instrument refused to make a sound.
“Well, I declare!” the maiden said, “Here, let me have a try.”
Her nimble fingers plucked the strings and then they gave a cry.
“Dear minstrel friend, it seems to me you’re needing some technique.
Now watch me closely, and I’ll show you how to make it speak.”
The minstrel watched indignantly while she the lute did play:
She played on it three galliards, one pavane and tuneful lay.
“Enough! Enough!” the minstrel said, “I know technique full well.
It’s clear to see that this must be the workings of a spell.”
“A spell!” she shrieked, and dropped the lute, a-clatt’ring to the floor.
“A spell!” he cried out fervently, and scared her even more.
“Sweet maiden, I implore you, go and find this evil man!
Go and find the wicked wizard who has caught me in his plan!” (keep reading)

Posted on 21 June 2008 by Mashkioya
Filed under: belles-lettres,Benjish literature,poetry

A History of the Numuh Nation

An experiment in alternate history…

The Numuhs originally roamed the plains of Northern Columbia, hunting buffalo and fighting neighboring tribes. However, once the Angles and Benjians arrived from Northern Evroop in 5636, their way of life was doomed.

The Angles from Angleland built a strong city on the Specific Coast, in eastern North Columbia in 5742. As more and more Angles immigrated to North Columbia, they forced the people who originally lived there to move farther west. These tribes had to move into the Numuhs’ territory. The Numuhs responded by fighting and raiding the displaced tribes.

In 5862, the Angles had taken over much more North Columbian land. The people who were displaced were moved to central North Columbia, where the Numuhs lived. The Angles had a very large establishment in North Columbia by this time, and had a large army. With this army, they drove the Numuhs south into Benjaland. Benjaland was very sparsely populated at that time, so the Numuhs were content to live there.

However, the Benjians, who had moved to North Columbia in 5797, began building cities in northern Benjaland, where the Numuhs then lived. Disturbed by the Numuhs’ raiding the new cities, the Angles and Benjians joined forces against the Numuhs. The Benjians did not have a large army, but they killed thousands of buffalo, which the Numuhs depended on. The Angles, in turn, drove the Numuhs north to Indian Territory, the area set aside for the native Columbians. Thousands had been forced to move there already.

The Numuhs fought back, but it was of no avail against the large armies of the Angles. The Numuhs were forced to leave their former way of life.

In Indian Territory, life was hard for the Numuhs, as for all the native Columbians who were forced to live there. The Angles divided the land and assigned a section to each tribe. The Numuhs were assigned a section with their old allies, the Koygwoos, and the Nadeens. (keep reading)

Posted on 13 June 2008 by Mashkioya
Filed under: miscellany

Canoeing the Brazos

These are some pictures from a recent canoe trip on the part of the Brazos River which snakes through the southwestern corner of Parker County.

 The river

The River

 

Click beetle

A click beetle

 

Beaver

My first beaver sighting!

 

Posted on by Mashkioya
Filed under: nature,photography