Ziphen Central

Seeking Wisdom and Sublimity

Hymn of the Week – What Wondrous Love Is This

Traditional American hymn
Lyrics first appeared in General Selection (1811) compiled by Stith Mead
Music first appeared in Southern Harmony (1840) compiled by William Walker

What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul,
What wondrous love is this, O my soul!
What wondrous love is this that caused the Lord of bliss
To bear the dreadful curse for my soul, for my soul,
To bear the dreadful curse for my soul.

When I was sinking down, sinking down, sinking down,
When I was sinking down, sinking down,
When I was sinking down beneath God’s righteous frown
Christ laid aside His crown for my soul, for my soul,
Christ laid aside His crown for my soul.

To God and to the Lamb I will sing, I will sing,
To God and to the Lamb I will sing;
To God and to the Lamb, who is the great “I Am,”
While millions join the theme, I will sing, I will sing,
While millions join the theme I will sing.

And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on,
And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on.
And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing and joyful be,
And through eternity I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on,
And through eternity I’ll sing on!

Posted on 25 April 2010 by Mashkioya
Filed under: Hymn of the Week,videos

Gertrude

From Ailenroc’s Book, by Cornelia Alexander

(From a novelette, “Bought with a Price,” by Mrs. Stephens.)

She stands receiving, like a beauteous queen,
Beneath the glitter of the chandelier,
With rich robes trailing from her dainty feet,
And perfume floating from her jeweled hair;
On neck and arms rare diamonds blaze,
Like glimmering fires, on fields of ice;
Yet all this splendor mocks her soul.
‘Tis bought, O Heaven, with a fearful price,
And naught but sorrow o’er thy heart shall brood
Through all thy future years, Gertrude.

Men wonder, and admire the being bright,
And women envy her the witching grace
Of every movement, and the beauty rare
Which glows in every lineament of her fair face,
And in their praise are eloquent and loud
Of her palatial home, for all that art
Or wealth can bring are there; all senses gratified,
But not the craving of her woman’s heart.
Amid the joyous throng she stands in solitude;
Wrecked are thy hopes, Gertrude.

She hears the murmur of the river low;
She hears the whisper of the larch trees yet,
And feels sweep o’er her heart, like ocean’s flow,
The love she slighted, but cannot forget.
Her glittering, gilded chains now clank with rust;
They eat, like canker, in her soul and brain.
Their glamor gone, she fain would yield her heart
To the sweet witchery of Love again;
But all too late, this sad, repentant mood;
Thy chains are riveted, Gertrude.

Posted on 22 April 2010 by Mashkioya
Filed under: Ailenroc's Book,poetry

Thoughts on Going to Europe

In case you are not aware, I will be studying in Europe next semester, along with a group of other students from my university. The other day we had another meeting about it, and after each of these weekly meetings I always leave with much excitement and anticipation. This time I had just turned in a sheet of paper which I will receive back after we return, on which I had written the reasons why I wanted to go to Europe.

I did not put a great amount of forethought into what I wrote on that sheet of paper, but as my thoughts flowed into slanted italic letters, I noticed that each of my reasons had to do with two main ideas: people and culture. You see, my impression of the past groups who have gone to Europe is that they went, they saw, and they came home. Granted, there are many amazing things to be seen on that continent, but I want more than that. I want to get to know the people there, their languages and their cultures.

Our home base will be Verviers, Belgium, a decently sized town in Wallonia. When I get to Verviers, I want to explore. (keep reading)

Posted on 21 April 2010 by Mashkioya
Filed under: college,language,opinions,travel